A Travellerspoint blog

Entries about me

Aarhus - and there's more ...

but it is nearly time to come home.

semi-overcast 10 °C

While I think we have seen our share of churches during our holiday, we did find a couple more which I thought may be of interest due to their historical significance.

While travelling into Aarhus on the bus one day, we chatted with an elderly lady who suggested we visit one of Aarhus’s churches, The Church of Our Lady. Originally known as St. Nicholas' Church, it was renamed after the Reformation in 1536 with the altarpiece and pulpit added in the mid 16thC. However our interest lay in the crypt church which was unveiled under the main building during restoration in the 1950s. Two graves were found - one of a child and one of an adult. This church is the oldest existing stone church in Scandinavia built in 1060. It was restored and reopened in 1957 and is still used for mass once a week. The crucifix above the altar is an exact copy of a Roman crucifix found in an old church in Aarhus, the original of which is now in the National Museum in Copenhagen. It is very unusual. The crypt church is lovely and well worth a visit.

The crypt church, The Church of Our Lady

The crypt church, The Church of Our Lady

Very interesting cruficix in the crypt church, The Church of Our Lady

Very interesting cruficix in the crypt church, The Church of Our Lady


After visiting Rikke’s family in Kolding one day we stopped to visit a lovely churchyard in Jelling south of Aarhus. The church dates from 1100 and the two large burial mounds and two massive carved rune stones from the 10th C.. The runic writings on the stones have been translated. The smaller and older one states that King Gorm the Old placed the stone in memory of his wife Thyra. The larger stone placed by King Gorm's son, Harald Bluetooth is in memory of his parents, and to celebrate his conquest of Denmark and Norway and his conversion of the Danes to Christianity. This stone has three sides and shows Christ with arms outstretched and a halo over his head. It is almost 2.5m tall and weighs 10ton!!

The body of King Gorm the Old was discovered under the church in 1978 and after extensive study was re-entombed in the church in 2000. How amazing is that!!

Jelling stones - massive carved runestones from the 10th century

Jelling stones - massive carved runestones from the 10th century

Standing on the burial mound looking towards church and rune stones

Standing on the burial mound looking towards church and rune stones

This is one of Denmark’s most important historical sites and is another UNESCO World Heritage Site. The inscription on the larger stone is considered to be the first written record in which the word ‘Denmark’ appears. They call it the ‘Danes Baptism Certificate’. A plaster cast of this stone has been made and a copy showing what are considered to be original colours lies outside the museum in Jelling.

Copy of Jelling carved rune stones from 10thC

Copy of Jelling carved rune stones from 10thC

One Sunday morning we decided to take a trip to Denmark’s Lake District. We set off but only five minutes later found ourselves unable to even read the signs on the motorway due to very heavy fog and light rain. However, we decided to continue (very carefully), and within a half hour the fog had lifted to a beautiful sunny, but cool day. Yeah!!

The ‘Lake District’ is an area around Silkeborg only 40km from Aarhus (has anyone watched Unit One on ABC TV which is set in Silkeborg??). This area is home to Denmark’s longest river (the Gudenå; 160km), Jutland’s biggest lake (Mossø) and Denmark’s highest point, Ejer Baunehøj (just under 171m!!). I counted 11 lakes (but I’m not sure – there may be more). A very picturesque area with a wonderful history.

As we had started our journey without breakfast we were on the lookout for somewhere to have lunch. Well, what did we find? A lovely restaurant with beautiful (vegan) food, in the most wonderful setting we could dream of. While it was too cold to eat our meal outside, we could not resist taking our coffee into the sunshine, with the odd canoe, small motor boats and a flock of ducks swimming by. Pure bliss.

View from our restaurant table

View from our restaurant table

Enjoying the sunshine  -  pure bliss

Enjoying the sunshine - pure bliss

Another definite ‘high’ was Himmelbjerget (The Sky Mountain) with a height of 147 meters. From 1839 open air meetings were held here where people came together to discuss the future of Denmark. On top of the hill is a 25 meter tall tower that was erected to honor King Frederik VII and his role in giving the Danish people a constitution in 1849. There are also a number of monuments several honouring Danish poets and one commemorating the women’s right to vote in 1915.

The Himmelbjerg Tower 25m tall

The Himmelbjerg Tower 25m tall


View of The Himmelbjerg Tower from across the lake where we enjoyed our lunch

View of The Himmelbjerg Tower from across the lake where we enjoyed our lunch

On the day we visited there were many people enjoying the last burst of 'summer'. Many Danish tourist attractions close for the winter period so they hold on to the idea of 'summer time' as long as they can. This is a very popular destination. It is a beautiful natural area with magnificent views. It was peaceful and relaxing as we enjoyed the view over Lake Julsø with boats gently moving across the still water, and the trees starting the change to their beautiful autumn colours. What a day!!

Lovely view of Lake Julsø from Himmelbjerget

Lovely view of Lake Julsø from Himmelbjerget

I have been enjoying the change of the season –daylight at 8am, watching the changing of the colours and the gradual loss of leaves from the trees, the cold days (currently max 7-10deg), and cosy evenings at home with the central heating!

We have continued to explore the local area seeking lovely restaurants to enjoy lunch. One of our favourite destinations has been the quaint Skovmøllen (The Mill in the Wood) which is part of Aarhus University’s Moesgård Museum. Now a restaurant, it used to be Moesgård manor's corn mill, located in the forest, ten minutes' walk from the museum. Moesgård museum specialises in archaeology and ethnography. It is so cool, and one of my favourite areas in Aarhus.

Skovmøllen (The Mill in the Wood) Restaurant

Skovmøllen (The Mill in the Wood) Restaurant

The creek beside the mill

The creek beside the mill

Another part of the Skovmøllen complex

Another part of the Skovmøllen complex

Ducks playing in the pond Skovmøllen

Ducks playing in the pond Skovmøllen

The museum has exhibitions in various places around their quite large complex and you find them as you walk around the area. For example we came across a reconstruction of what they consider the first churches in Denmark may have looked like (based on archaeological evidence).

Reconstruction of early Danish church

Reconstruction of early Danish church

We also came across two interesting sculptures that I think were made from willow, which caught Chas’s eye especially!!

Chas admiring sculpture, Moesgård Museum

Chas admiring sculpture, Moesgård Museum

Well everyone, this is my last post to the blog as we head home this weekend. I hope you have found it interesting and have enjoyed sharing our journey as much as I have enjoyed preparing it for you. A very rough calculation has shown that we will have travelled over 47,000 km (on our trips alone). We have so many wonderful memories to bring home with us.

I'll leave you with some pics of Aarhus. There are more pics in my public gallery for you to enjoy. If you click on 'Show as stream' you can also read my added comments and view them in medium or large sizes so the images are more clear.


Looking forward to seeing you soon.
Hej hej fra Danmark.
Pat

Interesting artwork on side of building

Interesting artwork on side of building

Temp 4degC 10.45am

Temp 4degC 10.45am

Aaron scraping frost from car windscreen

Aaron scraping frost from car windscreen

Designated lanes for cyclists

Designated lanes for cyclists

Interesting artwork on side of building

Interesting artwork on side of building

A few remaining yellow leaves on trees

A few remaining yellow leaves on trees

Avenue of trees which have already lost their leaves

Avenue of trees which have already lost their leaves


Risskov Forest

Risskov Forest

Moesgård Forest.  Trees have started to lose their leaves

Moesgård Forest. Trees have started to lose their leaves

Chas splashing me with water, Moesgård Forest

Chas splashing me with water, Moesgård Forest

Posted by patsaunder 12:07 Archived in Denmark Tagged me landscapes lakes churches art buildings people trees family_travel Comments (1)

Spain, Andalusia - Seville

sunny 33 °C

Seville is Spain's 4th largest city. The Rio Guadalquivir flows gently through the city of Seville which is divided into four separate areas on the eastern side (with a vibrant central shopping hub) and other traditional areas to explore across the river on the west bank. It is easy to find your way. We rented a penthouse apartment for our 3 days in Seville which was within easy walking distance of the main central tourist area.

We started our adventure with a relaxed stroll along the water to get our bearings and take in the atmosphere. Within 10 minutes (or so) we arrived at Seville's famous bullring Plaza de Toros de la Maestranza in the El Arenal quarter. Built in the 18th C, is Spain's oldest. The building certainly has a strong presence as it dominates this area of Seville. While Aaron and Rikke chose to visit it, Chas and I continued to wander quietly, window shopping and looking at the ceramics, beautiful dresses, fans, mantillas and other traditional items for which the area is renown.

In the 13thC Seville was guarded by the mighty Torre del Oro (Spanish: "Gold Tower") a dodecahedron (12 faces) military watchtower, built by the Moors in order to control access to Seville via the Guadalquivir river. It is quite an impressive building which is now used as a naval museum.

Torre del Oro

Torre del Oro

However, it is from the Torre del Oro that the river cruises depart, and that is what we decided to do to get a sense of the city. The river is quite wide but what quickly becomes apparent are the number of bridges which span it. Obviously the river and the bridges have played a big part in Seville's history. It is the only navigable river in Spain, and still navigable up to Seville.

Two bridges of interest are the Puente de Isabel II, built between 1845 and 1852. It is an interesting design, and obviously well built as it is still in use as a road bridge with hundreds of cars crossing back and forth each day. The other is the the Alamillo bridge built in 1992 when Seville hosted the World Expo. The site for the expo was La Cartuja Island, an area of the city previously undeveloped. As a result four new bridges were built of which the Alamillo is the largest and most impressive and is now a symbol for the city. Unfortunately we didn't get a pic of it.

Queen Isabel II bridge, Seville

Queen Isabel II bridge, Seville

Back on solid ground we just wandered through the narrow back streets of the central area enjoying the sights and sounds, looking at the gardens and the houses. The houses open directly onto the street and don't appear to be very impressive until one glimpses the internal courtyards which lie behind the front doors. Cool, colourful and beautiful.

External facade of homes directly onto the street

External facade of homes directly onto the street

Beautiful internal courtyards with external doors open

Beautiful internal courtyards with external doors open

It was 33deg when we were quietly walking through the back streets with interesting restaurants, shops and houses around every corner. I found it quite amusing to see this cafe with mists of water being sprayed onto lunchtime patrons to provide relief from the heat. I had not see this before.

Mists of water sprayed over cafe patrons to provide cool relief

Mists of water sprayed over cafe patrons to provide cool relief

However, the most impressive experience was our visit to Seville Cathedral. It is massive and is the most extensive Gothic cathedral in the world and the third-largest,and also another UNESCO world heritage site. Formerly Seville's Main Mosque in Moorish times, after the fall to the Christians it was taken over with construction work beginning in 1131 and the cathedral consecrated 1218. The visiting brochure indicates 44 points of interest to visit. While it is not possible to cover even a small number of these, I must tell you of two which were remarkable. The first is the main altarpiece. It is an overwhelming work of art which portrays carved scenes from the life of Christ. This was the lifetime work of a single craftsman, Pierre Dancart who spent 44 years making what you see. This photo does not capture the complete work as it is several stories high. It is beyond words to describe. You can see a full-size pic of it here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pierre_Dancart_Alterpiece_Seville.jpg It is worth having a look. The most immense work of art I have ever seen.

Seville Cathedral altarpiece

Seville Cathedral altarpiece

Inside the cathedral's southern door stands the Tomb of Christopher Columbus. It is an elaborate monument dating from 1890s with four bearers representing the four kingdoms of Spain at the time of Columbus' 1492 voyage (Castile, León, Aragón and Navarra) which was financed by King Fernando and Queen Isabel. Interesting from an historical perspective.

Tomb of Christopher Columbus

Tomb of Christopher Columbus

On our second day we wandered through Triana on the west bank where I was able to purchase some ceramics from Ceramica Santa Ana which has sold handmade traditional ceramics since 1870. It was an adventure to browse through the store and see the amazing array of items. We also could not go home without trying tapas in an authentic Spanish tapas bar. We ordered a range of five dishes to try which of course included the Jamon serrano (salt cured ham dried in mountain air) for which the area is renown.

Cured hams for tapas hanging in cafe

Cured hams for tapas hanging in cafe

Having our lovely penthouse apartment was a bonus as we were all craving 'healthy' food. Yes, even Aaron, Rikke and Chas were looking for a change. We were able to prepare lovely meals, and sit outside on the terrace with a glass of red in the cool of the evening. Fantastic.

Enjoying dinner on our penthouse apartment balcony

Enjoying dinner on our penthouse apartment balcony

On our final day in Spain we left Seville to travel back to Faro for our flight home to Aarhus. We had an awesome time as the number of blog posts show - Ronda, Alhambra, Sierra Nevada, flamenco, fiestas, history, tradition. However I found Andalusia to also be an area of contrasts. It appears not to be economically strong in some areas with run-down, undeveloped sections. These contrast with the vibrant, lavish city centres with exclusive stores such as Cartier, YSL. I even saw Billabong in Seville along with modern 'icons' such as McDonalds Coca Cola, ToysRUs and Ikea. However, we saw several large infrastructure projects funded by the EU which I would expect are providing funds to support economical development.

Muchas gracias for a wonderful time.

Posted by patsaunder 02:51 Archived in Spain Tagged me bridges churches art buildings family_travel Comments (0)

Spain, Andalusia - Granada

city tour, the Albaicin and ... flamenco

sunny 26 °C

We caught the bus into Granada and spent several hours wandering ... coffee in the square beside the Cathedral and window shopping. Lovely stores selling traditional Spanish items. Very relaxed.

A street stall selling spices and teas

A street stall selling spices and teas

Granada cathedral

Granada cathedral


Looking back to Alhambra from Albaicin

Looking back to Alhambra from Albaicin

Granada shops

Granada shops

Streets of Albaicin

Streets of Albaicin

However, our plan for the evening was to take a slow walk up the hill to enjoy the sights and sounds of The Albaicín, which has also been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site. This is the old Arabic quarter located on the hill opposite the Alhambra. It is characterised by cobble-stoned streets with white washed houses, lovely little alleyways and inviting restaurants. The imposing structure of the Alhambra dominates. Your eyes are drawn to it as it is visible everywhere you walk. A beautiful area.

Street in the Albaicin

Street in the Albaicin

A beautiful pic of Granada looking out from Albaicin towards Alhambra

A beautiful pic of Granada looking out from Albaicin towards Alhambra

We had reserved a table at a traditional restaurant for dinner and a flamenco concert. Yeah!!! They say that Flamenco started in Andalusia. We were very excited. It was a great show and a wonderful experience.

Flamenco dancing

Flamenco dancing

Flamenco dancing

Flamenco dancing


Flamenco dancing

Flamenco dancing

Flamenco dancing

Flamenco dancing

Posted by patsaunder 23:06 Archived in Spain Tagged me art people parties family_travel Comments (0)

Spain, Andalusia - Granada

Sierra Nevada

sunny -27 °C

Granada sits at the foot of the Sierra Nevada (670m above sea level), a range of 14 peaks more than 3000m high only 40km from the Mediterranean. We were fortunate to have these beautiful mountains as the backdrop for our stay in Hotel Cerra del Sol. It felt as though we could reach out and touch them, they were so close. We could not miss this opportunity to experience their rugged beauty.

With directions from our trusty Tom Tom we set off to enjoy the Vereda de la Estrella in the Sierra Nevada range following the Rio Genil (Genil River), approx. 1300m high.

We had only travelled a short distance before we had to leave the motorway and face the challenges of navigating the local roads. A missed turn on one occasion took us through extremely narrow, windy alleyways of one of the villages which caused some consternation. Eventually, through Aaron's determination, and a little luck, we finally found our way and were again on our journey. Whew!!!

However, our relief was short lived as we then realised that the road on which we were travelling into the mountains was not only windy and narrow, but also suited to single vehicle traffic, with only occasional lay-bys for passing traffic, and .... several tunnels!!! With bated breath we continued on, thankfully arriving at our destination without major incident. While one could assume this was due to limited traffic, in fact when we reach the end of the road where the walk commenced there were no spaces in the car park!! We passed many many people who were also walking this beautiful country ..... we even saw a mountain biker!!

I might add we had the same situation on the return trip, but this time we were forewarned... The road on the right of this first pic is the access road to the carpark.

Access road - on right of pic

Access road - on right of pic

Approaching tunnel on single vehicle road.

Approaching tunnel on single vehicle road.

The path was well formed, in parts zigzaging steeply uphill and others gently sloping. We passed over a couple of small streams as the water found its way down the slopes to the river. Through the dense trees we could imagine the Genil river flowing in the deep canyon below.

Rugged terrain

Rugged terrain

Rugged terrain.   Notice the stone building foundations close to centre of this pic.  I wonder what it was ..

Rugged terrain. Notice the stone building foundations close to centre of this pic. I wonder what it was ..


Enjoying the walk

Enjoying the walk


Happy walkers

Happy walkers


Enjoying lunch under the only shade we could find

Enjoying lunch under the only shade we could find

What a wonderful day we had. Fine weather, warm but not too hot, the enjoyment of being physically active, taking time to enjoy our lunch in the shade beside the path, and a sense of satisfaction of having experienced this rugged country - simple but rewarding pleasures. Aaron's only disappointment was that he did not see any mouflon (wild sheep).

The next day we ventured to the highest point we could reach, this time by vehicle, over 2100m. What a sight.

Panorama - Sierra Nevada

Panorama - Sierra Nevada

Panorama - Sierra Nevada

Panorama - Sierra Nevada

Panorama - Sierra Nevada

Panorama - Sierra Nevada


Aaron on top of the world!

Aaron on top of the world!

Posted by patsaunder 23:20 Archived in Spain Tagged me mountains skylines people trees family_travel Comments (0)

Spain, Andalusia - Granada

the Alhambra

sunny 30 °C

Our main reason for choosing Granada was a visit to the Alhambra which has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and is one of Europe's most visited attractions.

Its history is linked with its geographic location - on a hill which was difficult to access and protected by the mountains. Originally designed as a military area, the Alhambra became the residence of royalty and of the court of Granada in the middle of the thirteenth century, after the establishment of the Nasrid kingdom.

Commenced in 1248 it was built by the Nasrid rulers and used as a residence for the sultans, military commanders, civil servants and the royal court. The beautiful intricate craftsmanship, and the use of space, light, decoration and water is spectacular. Apparently Arabic artisans, supervised by poets, were employed to engrave poems and various writings and quotations from the Koran onto the walls, arches and pillars in calligraphic decoration and arabic script.

The Charles V Palace (which was built after the city was taken by the Catholic Monarchs in 1492) is also here. There is also an independent palace opposite the Alhambra where the Granadine kings relaxed called the Generalife which is surrounded by orchards and gardens.

The complex is massive consisting of three palaces, the Alcazaba or fortress, the Medina (town area) and the Generalife. It is magnificent.

I think I will just let the pictures speak for themselves, though it is difficult to convey its splendour. Here are several to whet your interest. There are many others in my public gallery.

Example of the beautiful ceramic tiling

Example of the beautiful ceramic tiling


The Arrayanes Courtyard

The Arrayanes Courtyard


Roof of the Abencerrajes Hall

Roof of the Abencerrajes Hall


Detail of the roof of the Abencerrajes Hall.   How awesome is that!!

Detail of the roof of the Abencerrajes Hall. How awesome is that!!


Intricate carvings

Intricate carvings


Detail of calligraphic detail and arabic script on walls

Detail of calligraphic detail and arabic script on walls


Beautiful design

Beautiful design

The Palace of Charles V is also a magnificent building, interesting in that it is built in an external square block, but with an circular internal courtyard. Chas and I visited the Museum of Fine Arts and learned that Granada has a long history of artistic excellence with many artists who have lived and worked here. The museum displayed fine examples of paintings and sculptures portraying the evolution of their art from the Christian times of 15thC to the modern day. Excellent.

Courtyard Carlos V Palace

Courtyard Carlos V Palace


View of Alhambra palaces (left), and Carlos V palace (right) from the Alcazaba

View of Alhambra palaces (left), and Carlos V palace (right) from the Alcazaba

Unfortunately we were unable to see one of the main attractions which is currently being restored. This is The Lions Fountain, a magnificent alabaster basin supported by the figures of twelve lions in white marble which sits in the centre of the courtyard in The Lion's Palace. This alone would be worth another visit!! I do have a postcard if anyone would like to see it.

This is an amazing complex with so much to see. I think several visits would be needed to enjoy it fully. As a result we did not have time to explore the villa of the Generalife, but we did take time to wander through the magnificent gardens before heading home. A wonderful day!! I wonder if I will ever return .... I hope so.

Gardens at Generalife

Gardens at Generalife

Posted by patsaunder 23:38 Archived in Spain Tagged me art buildings family_travel Comments (0)

(Entries 1 - 5 of 7) Page [1] 2 » Next